Year of Palladio

Educational Buildings

Following Jeffersonís precedent, we have countless educational buildings in Palladioís classical tradition, McKim, Mead, and Whiteís Low Library at Columbia University, like the University of Virginiaís Rotunda, takes its cue from the Pantheon, both works being expressed as domed temples of learning. The campus of MIT is defined by a Pantheon-type structure as well, fronted by a decastyle Ionic colonnade. At Yale University, the dome and colonnade of Carrere & Hastingsí Memorial Rotunda take their cue from Bramanteís Tempietto in Rome, the one Renaissance work Palladio included among the buildings he illustrated in Book Four (Figure 67). Palladio expressed his admiration of Bramante when he wrote:

ìBramante was the first to make known that good and beautiful architecture which had been hidden from the time of the ancients till now, I thought it reasonable that his work should be placed amongst those of the ancients…î (Figure 68)

Extending behind the Memorial Rotunda is Thomas Hastingsí great Corinthian colonnade of 1927 recalling the remaining colonnade of Romeís Temple of the Divine Hadrian, a structure measured and drawn by Palladio (which he identified as the Temple of Mars _. In seeking a less monumental example, we find that the Palladian influence can reveal itself in surprising places. The entrance feature of a gymnasium at Woodberry Forest School in Virginia is inspired by the Villa Emo. _(Figure 71)

Figure 67
Figure 67
Figure 68
Figure 68
Figure 69
Figure 69
Figure 70
Figure 70
Figure 71
Figure 71

Public Buildings | Educational Buildings | Museums

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Educational Buildings

Following Jeffersonís precedent, we have countless educational buildings in Palladioís classical tradition, McKim, Mead, and Whiteís Low Library at Columbia University, like the University of Virginiaís Rotunda, takes its cue from the Pantheon, both works being expressed as domed temples of learning. The campus of MIT is defined by a Pantheon-type structure as well, fronted by a decastyle Ionic colonnade. At Yale University, the dome and colonnade of Carrere & Hastingsí Memorial Rotunda take their cue from Bramanteís Tempietto in Rome, the one Renaissance work Palladio included among the buildings he illustrated in Book Four (Figure 67). Palladio expressed his admiration of Bramante when he wrote:

ìBramante was the first to make known that good and beautiful architecture which had been hidden from the time of the ancients till now, I thought it reasonable that his work should be placed amongst those of the ancients…î (Figure 68)

Extending behind the Memorial Rotunda is Thomas Hastingsí great Corinthian colonnade of 1927 recalling the remaining colonnade of Romeís Temple of the Divine Hadrian, a structure measured and drawn by Palladio (which he identified as the Temple of Mars _. In seeking a less monumental example, we find that the Palladian influence can reveal itself in surprising places. The entrance feature of a gymnasium at Woodberry Forest School in Virginia is inspired by the Villa Emo. _(Figure 71)

Figure 67
Figure 67
Figure 68
Figure 68
Figure 69
Figure 69
Figure 70
Figure 70
Figure 71
Figure 71

Public Buildings | Educational Buildings | Museums

Download PDF | Back to Index | Back to Essays